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– > risk of provoking an action for infringement. Not all former trademark owners would accept the conclusion of an agreement, but could instead initiate opposition proceedings or an infringement action against the young party. In theory, a trademark coexistence agreement will generally specify the goods (services), sales areas and other such elements of the parties and stipulate that the parties may not do anything that would harm trademark rights to essentially limit the rights of the former rights holder. For reasons of fairness, the implementation of a coexistence agreement should take into account the interests of the parties having an essential interest in the earlier mark. Coexistence agreements generally act by limiting the extension and use of similar trademarks to certain geographical areas or certain types of goods or services. A coexistence agreement should also include provisions regarding trademarks that may not yet be used. . . .